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Why You Should See A Pain Management Psychiatrist

May 4th, 2009 · 11 Comments

Updated 2010 articles in this series:

  1. Why comprehensive treatment works better
  2. Benefits of a psychiatric evaluation
  3. Treatment of psychiatric symptoms
  4. Using psychiatric medications for pain
  5. Learning psychological skills
  6. Making positive behavioral changes
  7. Making positive psychological changes
  8. Benefits of supportive therapy
  9. Benefits of a pain support group
  10. New brain-based treatments

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11 responses so far ↓

  • Esther // May 4, 2009 at 2:51 pm

    Have you read this? And what do you think?

  • Esther // May 4, 2009 at 2:52 pm

    http://healthskills.wordpress.com/
    This is what I meant to forward. I’m sorry.

  • How to Cope with Pain // May 4, 2009 at 5:20 pm

    This is a very helpful website. The April pain-blog carnival has 1 of the posts from this site featured.

  • Barbara // May 5, 2009 at 12:45 am

    I have full body RSD and have had most every treatment that has been used in the last20 years but I can truthfully say that the one that helped most was the work I have done with psychiatrists and psychogist who specialize in pain
    Self hypnosis which is a learned skill can often help cap a pain level that is spiraling up

    Just being able to say the things that I feel without worrying about how it will sound to or upset my loved ones …like … At least once a day. I think that,”I can’t do this anymore!!” an upsetting thought that may last a few seconds but I have been assured that it is ok to feel that way. It is ok to get depressed. It is appropiate to allow myself to be upset and then move on

    How do we who love in chronic pain access the strenghts that we still have, how to use precious energy to acheive goals that have without increasing pain levels….I could go on and on but what I want to stress is that there is no threat when someone thinks it would help to see a psychiatrist or psychologist to help you deal with pain just make sure that you see someone who is trained and understands chronic pain

  • How to Cope with Pain // May 5, 2009 at 7:42 am

    Barbara, thanks for your comment. I think you’re right on with the rec to see someone with expertise in pain. I’ll write more about this next Monday.

  • Sherrie S // May 5, 2009 at 5:17 pm

    I admit: I still feel hackles raising when I consider the inclusion of a psychiatrist in the medical-team approach to chronic pain management. Before you jump on me (rightly, I admit), please know I absolutely get why this is a necessary addition to the treatment program. There are useful skills to be learned in terms of framing thoughts, approaching emotional stress, and so on in the face of chronic daily pain experiences.

    But it sniffs of “it’s all in your head” — and those of us with fibromyalgia or ME/CFS have been there, heard that, and got the unbelievable stress headaches to prove it.

    I’d echo Barbara’s comments on how necessary it is to select any provider (of any field/specialty) with CP experience, and add that they’d better be patient-centered and respectful if they want my “business.”

    At a minimum, they’d need to understand the very basic premise that chronic pain caused my periodic depressive thoughts, and not the other way around!

  • How to Cope with Pain // May 5, 2009 at 6:03 pm

    Sherrie, I appreciate your writing, even if you’re skeptical. You’re right – if you get a referral because medical pain is thought to be “all in your head,” I’d run for the hills, too!

    I hope this series can shed some light on the ways people can benefit from psychiatric pain management.

  • Lorraine // Jun 23, 2009 at 10:08 pm

    Where can I find a psychiatrist/pain management specialist? I have asked several people and no one has heard of one. I would travel to NJ, PA, or NY. Thank you.

  • How to Cope with Pain // Jun 27, 2009 at 7:18 pm

    Lorraine, I’m on vacation right now, but will respond in early July.

  • Diane // Sep 27, 2011 at 9:04 am

    Lorraine – I’m with you. I’m in NJ and I can’t find a single person!! Don’t know where to go and am looking as best I can. Guess I’ll start asking all my Dr. if they have any. I’ll keep you posted to what I find as I have a dr apt today.

  • James // Mar 10, 2013 at 10:08 pm

    Looking for a Pschiatrist in Central MA who is experienced with paitients w/ Chronic Pain…

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