How To Cope With Pain Blog header image 1


Ketamine Used On Your Skin Can Reduce Pain

April 21st, 2010 · 3 Comments

Ketamine is a controversial medication for pain, but we continue to learn more about its possible uses.   A team in Australia recently published work that shows that topical ketamine, that is, applied to your skin, is effective for temporary reduction in some pain in CRPS.

While the cream didn’t decrease overall, ongoing pain in patients’ affected areas, it did reduce allodynia.  Allodynia is heightened sensitivity – pain which is caused by things that shouldn’t cause pain.  For example, in patients with CRPS, light clothing or a breeze – which are fine for most people – can cause pain.  So with ketamine, this sensitivity was decreased.

Topical ketamine can be a good option for patients with localized symptoms, and may be without any significant side effects.  In the study, topical ketamine treatment showed no detectible blood levels, so little was absorbed.

The original study is “Reduction of allodynia in patients with complex regional pain syndrome: A double–blind placebo–controlled trial of topical ketamine,” by Finch et al, in Pain, Nov 2009, Vol 146, pages 18-25.

A unique Grand Rounds – done with pictures instead of words – is posted at The Sterile Eye.


Sign up for free delivery of How to Cope with Pain by email or RSS feed. If you liked this post, I'd appreciate your linking to it from your site or spreading the word through your favorite social media.

Tags: 1

3 responses so far ↓

  • patricia // May 3, 2010 at 9:49 pm

    The article re. ketamine as a topical anesthetic is irrrelevant in the USA since the drug is only sold on the street or rarely used in surgical procedures.

  • How to Cope with Pain // May 3, 2010 at 10:08 pm

    Actually, Patricia, Ketamine can put “compounded” into a cream and put on topically (on the skin), so this study is relevant.

  • patricia // Mar 5, 2013 at 2:32 pm

    How much Ketamine is absorberd in the body if I took a lotion of 10% ketamine and is rash afflicated with combination lotions.

Leave a Comment